MEGAN FOX - Out of the Shadows

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Ever since Megan Fox hit Hollywood, she has been the talk of the town as one of the most seductive actresses of the Millennium. Since her start in modeling and through her acting career, there’s not much that she can do without literally sweating sex appeal.

Though she may be best known for her roles in the first two installments of the Transformers series, Transformers (2007) and Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen (2009), true fans of the stunning siren agree that one of her most vivacious roles and best performances of her acting career was in the 2009 dark comedy supernatural horror film, Jennifer’s Body, starring opposite another beautiful temptress, Amanda Seyfried, and written by stripper-turned-screenwriter, Diablo Cody (Best Original Screenplay Oscar winner for Juno). In the film, Fox’s character becomes possessed and turns into a flesh-eating zombie, which of course, revives her totally hot body and face to “hottie” perfection every time she devours a soul. The movie’s snarky sass toward the often shallow existence of high-schoolers became so popular within the dark comedy cinephile community that you can find it posted all over the Internet, with social media sites dedicated to film, like the Tumblr account, FuckYeahJennifersBody. Fans just can’t seem to get enough of that sexy sass.

Always wanting a family of her own, Fox was granted that wish immediately when she married Beverly Hills 90210’s Brian Austin Green, who brought his son, Kassius (age 14) from a previous relationship. Between films, at age 27, Fox gave birth to her first son, Noah, and hasn’t stopped since, with son Bodhi born one year later, and now a bit of an unexpected third child announced eight months after the couple actually filed for divorce last year. Their relationship of more than 11 years together was mostly strained from arguments over Fox’s heavy work schedule, yet they’ve been seen together as a family often since the announcement of the new baby to come. Their children are absolutely adorable, and Fox has been quoted as saying she’ll be happy with having another boy, and just as pleased if it’s a girl.

Fox now returns to the big screen as the popular character, April O’Neil, in the film reboot of the animated family favorite, TMNT franchise, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows.

Stunning as always, with a mom-to-be glow, Fox took a moment to discuss her work on the sequel to the ever-popular comic, revealing her true nerdy love for the original television series as a child; her take on why the Turtles have become so popular; and what it was like to work with the Turtle cast and crew.

SMARTY: What is it about the Turtles, do you think, that has made them so popular all over the world?
FOX: So I have theories on this. My theories are that the four Turtles were based on the four Greek temperaments, which are basically four different psychological types that every person would fall under. So it’s easy to find one that is sort of reflective of your own inner self. And we all love ourselves, right? At heart, we’re all narcissists, and so we want to see ourselves on screen. And that’s what’s happening. Or you see your brother or your mother or whoever. It would be weird to see your mother in one of the Turtles, however, it is possible. And then it, in combination with the fact that they were born out of turtle irreverence, like, that’s where the Turtles were created to make fun of comic books, basically. And so because there’s always… everything is sort of done with a wink, it’s fun and it’s without burden, because it’s so lighthearted. 
SMARTY: I’ve understood you’ve had your own, very personal attachment to the Turtles?
FOX: I grew up watching the movies because I have an older sister. She’s twelve years older. And I wanted to do everything she did. And she watched the movies and I just loved them. I just took to them.  

“ I was very small—I mean, three, four, five years old, and we were watching them [TMNT] on VHS, on a tiny, like 17-inch television. And I just… I loved, I don’t know… how sort of like campy, and silly, but exciting and weird and like this sort of dark world that they lived in, but they were such a little bright light in that little world. I just loved it.”  

SMARTY: Do you think it’s a large difference for kids to experience the Turtles on the big screen in comparison to their television show?
FOX: Well, when I was a kid, I didn’t know any different. That tiny television was the best! The fact that we even had a television, I was like, so excited, because we lived somewhere where most people didn’t even have televisions. But yeah, seeing them on the big screen is definitely a very different experience.
SMARTY: Do you think the new movie captures the essence of the cartoon and its characters?
FOX: So, the new movie definitely falls in line, I think, with the ‘90s cartoon. I feel like totally that’s where it lands. And then we see a few new villains. We do have Shredder in this movie, but we also have Bebop and Rocksteady, which hard-core fans of the cartoon comic would know. We also have sort of the master puppeteer, which is Krane. And he is an alien brain creature who lives inside the stomach cavity of a humanoid robot that he built.
SMARTY: Where do we find your character, April, in this sequel, and what has changed since the last movie?
FOX: So, we find April still working for Channel 6, and she’s doing some sort of what seems like undercover work. And she’s communicating with one of the Turtles the whole time, and you realize that they’re sort of aiding her in locating targets and doing the research that she’s doing. She’s more focused on just her relationship with the Turtles. She’s like a bridge for them between the sewers and the rest of humanity and sort of helping them try and fight their turtle crime. 
SMARTY: What was your approach to your character, April, this time around?
FOX: This April that we had, at least in the first movie, was sort of a mixture of lots of different manifestations of April. I can’t say that any one, particular version influenced me. I think just interacting with the boys influences me, because they give you so much to react to, and you end up loving them so much, because they were all so perfectly cast as their characters, that I feel like that sort of brings their relationship to life.
SMARTY: What appealed to you the most about doing a sequel from both your personal and your character’s perspective?
FOX: I mean, I think just being able to work with the same guys again, and all the guys that play the Turtles are super talented, and everybody involved in making this movie really loves it. Yeah, this time around, April isn’t so much chasing her career. She’s more chasing, you know, whatever it is that’s moving her in the moment and what she’s passionate about, which is something I sort of relate to.
SMARTY: Tell us about Casey Jones.
FOX: A lot of people love Casey Jones. So, Casey is that character, sort of like, he’s irreverent, he’s very like New York-y in-your-face. He’s a vigilante; sort of wreckless. And there are some of those elements that still exist in the Casey that we have in our the movie, as well, who’s played by Stephen Amell.  
SMARTY: Tell us about how your character, April, meets Casey Jones?
FOX: April has broken into TCRI, which is where Baxter’s documents lab is, and she’s stolen something she shouldn’t have, and she’s being chased by the Foot Clan, and cornered and stuck, and the Turtles haven’t come to rescue her yet. And all of a sudden a hockey puck comes flying in and takes down one of the Foot soldiers. And at the end of it all, standing, is Casey Jones. 
SMARTY: Comics always have some of the best villians. Who is the new threat that faces the Turtles in this movie?
FOX: Well, aside from the main villain, Krang, who has unleashed a plot or device that potentially destroy the world—basically, they’re also fighting Bebop and Rocksteady and trying to shut down a device that is opening up over New York City that poses a threat to the entire world and human existence.
SMARTY: How about that set for the Turtles’ lair—incredible, huh?
FOX: The lair is amazing. That’s one of the best sets I’ve been on, and I hope they never tear it down, because it’s so intricate and colorful and inspirational and creative. That’s one of my favorite sets I’ve ever been on. I think it’s like an award-winning set.
SMARTY: Tell us about Tyler Perry.
FOX: Tyler’s a really like, gentle, kind, polite, wonderful human being. And he does a lot of really great physical stuff with his character, like the way that he walks. You know, he walks with this sort of little, wounded… like he’s got a limp. He’s a really interesting actor and a great guy.
SMARTY: And what’s Will Arnett like on set?

“ [Will] is our comic relief—and he’s that way when the camera’s rolling and when it’s not rolling. And that’s much appreciated on those super long days where everybody’s exhausted. You need somebody there who’s gonna make you laugh, and he does that for us.”

SMARTY: It was your first time working with director Dave Green. How would you describe working him?
FOX: Dave’s really compassionate and soft-spoken, like, mild-mannered and patient. Those are things you don’t usually find in a director. So he sets a wonderful tone for the movie, because it allows the rest of us to be relaxed and comfortable, and that’s when people do their best work.
SMARTY: After all your hard work that goes into putting a movie together, when you finally get to see the movie, is it more of a relief to you that it’s over and you can breathe, or more fun and surprising to see the end result?
FOX: Yeah, it’s fun to see the movie, because so much of it is done in post. But also, it’s crazy to see, because you shoot so much footage, and the movie can only be so long. So it’s interesting to see what ends up on the cutting room floor, and then what actually makes it in. And then all of this new stuff that you never even imagined all of a sudden is in the movie along with you.
SMARTY: What do you love most about the TMNT franchise?
FOX: I love that it spans so many different generations. You have people in their forties excited to see it, because they grew up with it when they were younger teenagers. And then you have little kids who have been introduced to it through Nickelodeon, and the cartoon that’s on now. You know, you have four-year-olds, three-year-olds, that want to see it. That’s such an interesting thing that you don’t usually get when you make a movie—to reach so many different people.
SMARTY: Can you reveal some of the biggest differences that this movie has that the first one didnt?
FOX: It’s definitely a lot bigger. There’s a lot more action than the first one. It’s also way lighter. They focused a lot on the comedy and the relationship with the Turtles. There’s just more Turtles. More action.  More spectacle.
SMARTY: Is there a scene or sequence that stands out for you?
FOX: I think all the stuff they shot in Brazil is pretty insane. It’s just gorgeous. They shot at the falls and it’s sort of mind-blowing, the scope of that and to watch it, for me, because I also loved the cartoon when I was a kid, watching the final sequence with Karen and the Turtles is pretty exciting. It just reminds me, and makes me feel like a six-year-old again.

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